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Another example of the future of lower league clubs?

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Comments

  • The thing that concerns me most about this is that Macclesfield Town are still signing up new players on new contracts (two in the last week) despite the fact that they have repeatedly defaulted on payment of wages to existing players and currently have a number of players who have not been paid and have no idea if they ever will be. In my opinion, as a minimum, the EFL should have implemented a transfer embargo and refused to accept and register new signings by the club until verified proof of payment to existing players has been provided. The EFL have, sadly very predictably, taken no apparent action whatsoever.

  • The link takes me into the BBC Sport App but I couldn’t find the Macclesfield bit. Don’t like the sound of what’s going on there though.

  • @Uncle_T said:
    The thing that concerns me most about this is that Macclesfield Town are still signing up new players on new contracts (two in the last week) despite the fact that they have repeatedly defaulted on payment of wages to existing players and currently have a number of players who have not been paid and have no idea if they ever will be. In my opinion, as a minimum, the EFL should have implemented a transfer embargo and refused to accept and register new signings by the club until verified proof of payment to existing players has been provided. The EFL have, sadly very predictably, taken no apparent action whatsoever.

    Absolutely agree, what a ludicrous and morally bankrupt situation.

  • edited July 5

    What I can't understand is why these new players appear happy to sign contracts with Macclesfield when it seems getting your wages is like getting blood out of a stone?

  • From the story it seems the club is being rather sneaky - the unpaid players are those who haven't played for the first team or, by the sounds of it, are at the end of their contracts. Probably hoped they'd just walk away without a fuss.

    Anyone on Twitter who's interested in football finance and its various shenanigans, should follow Price of Football. Amazing what you can get away with with clever accountants and no scruples.

  • I think clever accountants would avoid involvement in lower league football.

  • Leaving aside the obscene gap in wealth between the Premier league and real football ie us and below at what point do clubs at our level go part time and the leagues become regional ?

  • @Chris said:
    I think clever accountants would avoid involvement in lower league football.

    Lol

  • @Chris said:
    I think clever accountants would avoid involvement in lower league football.

    Avoid investment, by all means, but why involvement? There's tonnes of cash wadding round.

  • @Mr67 said:
    Leaving aside the obscene gap in wealth between the Premier league and real football ie us and below at what point do clubs at our level go part time and the leagues become regional ?

    If that happened, the top clubs would surely hoover up an even higher percentage of the younger players, as the chances of stepping up from the lower leagues would surely reduce if players were part time.

  • Yes I agree but I wonder if it's going that way For many clubs that may be the only model that works financially in the long term or go bust.

  • @micra said:
    The link takes me into the BBC Sport App but I couldn’t find the Macclesfield bit. Don’t like the sound of what’s going on there though.

    Yes, it does that to me all the time if I come on here from my phone (links work fine on PC/laptop).

    To get round it on the phone is a bit fiddly. You have to copy the link and then paste it onto a new webpage. To allow the link to be copied I have to open it up by using 'quote' and then select and copy the webpage header.

    That's progress for you. Never had that problem with Ringing the Blues...

  • It’s a bit easier if you’re using Chrome, hold down on the link then select β€˜open in new tab’.

  • @Ned_Ludd said:
    It’s a bit easier if you’re using Chrome, hold down on the link then select β€˜open in new tab’.

    This works in Safari too with the added benefit of not having Google spying on everything you do.

  • Thanks @Ned_Ludd & @drcongo. That makes me feel ludicrously old and out of touch. (Good tip though)

  • @drcongo As you mention spying, when I use Firefox to access this site it gives me the warning "Tracking attempts blocked". Are you spying on us?

  • As my Irish friends say, β€œAy Spay with May little Ay”. The northern ones at least.

    Copy and paste on to a new webpage @bookertease ? I wouldn’t have a clue how to do that. I think I have the edge when it comes to feeling ludicrously old and out of touch. Which reminds me. Didn’t Hutch always refer to the ball going out of touch for a throw-in?

  • That is the correct terminology

  • No, the ball goes into touch.

  • Thought it was out of play or into touch, though isn't the later a rugby term?

  • @micra said:
    No, the ball goes into touch.

    Every commentator I've ever heard will say the ball goes out of touch for a throw in/corner/goal kick

    In Rugby they will say it's gone into touch, or even found touch

  • Into, out of - let’s call the whole thing off!

  • And let's all do the Hokey Cokey @micra

  • I fear it’s too risky for me to shake anything about these days @mooneyman.

  • I should have sought the advice of @glasshalffull I suppose. I think few football commentators (post Hutch) refer to β€œtouch” in any case. They say β€œthe ball’s gone out for a throw” or something similar but the simple fact is that β€œtouch” is the area outside the playing area and Hutch used to say, oddly, that the ball had gone β€œout of touch for a throw in”. β€œIt’s gone out for a throw in” - fine. But if you introduce β€œtouch” then the correct description is β€œthe ball has gone into touch.

  • Out of touch is the correct terminology

  • I can't recall ever hearing a commentator say "out of touch"

  • How about a compromise?

    "The ball has gone out into touch"

  • Surely a ball that has gone β€œout of touch” is one that has neglected its friends and no longer knows the correct slang terms to use.

  • If there is any sentiments of "touch", the ball definitely goes "into", rather than "out of" touch.

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